Aug 31 2015

Warriors in Pink Journaling

by Kathryn Budig

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photo: Under Armour

 

I know we’re not all writers, but I still think everyone can benefit from an emotional purge on paper from time to time. I’m referring to journaling—not the kind with the pink pen and heart shaped lock that you had as a kid, or the book that you stashed under your mattress to keep away from prying eyes. I’m talking about a journal or account of your feelings either on paper or your computer where you can make sense of the multitude of emotions thrown at us daily.

As a Model of Courage for Warriors in Pink, I’m constantly thinking of ways to create more good days for anyone battling with breast cancer—whether it be directly or as someone supporting a friend or family member. Journaling struck me as a simple yet powerful way to connect with your truth regularly, and get emotions out that can ofter fester if kept bottled up.

Let’s start by stating this proudly: I am a grown woman/man who keeps a journal.

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photo: Andrew Cebulka for Power Balance

I’m not saying this needs to be daily or that you need to wax poetic in your entries, it’s just a therapeutic place for us to deal with what’s hard to discuss out loud. This is particularly helpful if you’re struggling with your health and need a place to feel understood or safe. Here’s 2 tips to get you going:

1. Always remember the 90/10 theory—that 10% of every situation is factual and can’t be avoided. For example, if you have breast cancer, it’s factual. There’s no denying it—it’s reality. The remaining 90% is how you react to your situation or your perception. You can choose to play the victim, to focus on every bad detail and manifest horrible things coming your way. On the flip side you have the power to stand tall in your situation, to see the silver lining in every situation, and visualize all the beauty you want to pull into your life. 90% means the odds are in your favor. So whatever situation you’re writing about—no matter how horrific or frustration—remember this theory and apply it as you write about your feelings. Write out what you WANT instead of focusing on what’s holding you down.

2. 90% is a great percentage, but the 10% is still real which means you’re entitled to pulling our your mini violin and feeling awful. A journal is a fantastic place to purge all of your bad feelings and get them out of your system. Rant, rave—get it all out! Much better to say these things to a computer or piece of paper without feelings then out loud to someone who will never forget the words. Once you’ve cleansed yourself, go back to the 90% and live there.

Visit fordcares.com to check out more activities and ideas from my fellow Models of Courage who have gone through the breast cancer battle.